khealywu:

womaninterrupted:

x

"Specimen"

I had quite the reaction to this.

Absolute funniest line of the movie: “I’ve been Aaron.” dcpierson

(Source: forassgard, via purns)

28,602 notes

Hi. You’re welcome.

Katai Blerg turned 6 today!
Jesus Christ, what am I doing with my life?

Katai Blerg turned 6 today!

Jesus Christ, what am I doing with my life?

(Source: assets)

4 notes

Remember how in the ’90s teenagers would vary their capitalization for no apparent reason? thEYd beAll LIKe thIS liKe WaaaZZZuuuPPP?

That’s what this hashtag bullshit is. I’ve been seeing it pop up on Tumblr more and more frequently. You can’t hashtag whole sentences, kids. It’s just uncalled for. It brings attention to jack shit. It’s like taking a highlighter to a whole page of text. What the fuck, young people? Just use a period. Use a comma. Why do you hate periods and commas so much? Periods and commas are your friends. Hashtags aren’t your friends. Hashtags are the juvenile delinquents of the keyboard. Hashtags are trying to get you suspended with them because they have an unhappy home life. Hashtags hate their parents and they’re taking it out on your sentences.

6 notes

A four part study in how quickly I can get uncomfortable with looking nice in a photo and go straight to self-sabotage.

A four part study in how quickly I can get uncomfortable with looking nice in a photo and go straight to self-sabotage.

7 notes

"Ten rape prevention tips:

1. Don’t put drugs in women’s drinks.

2. When you see a woman walking by herself, leave her alone.

3. If you pull over to help a woman whose car has broken down, remember not to rape her.

4. If you are in an elevator and a woman gets in, don’t rape her.

5. When you encounter a woman who is asleep, the safest course of action is to not rape her.

6. Never creep into a woman’s home through an unlocked door or window, or spring out at her from between parked cars, or rape her.

7. Remember, people go to the laundry room to do their laundry. Do not attempt to molest someone who is alone in a laundry room.

8. Use the Buddy System! If it is inconvenient for you to stop yourself from raping women, ask a trusted friend to accompany you at all times.

9. Carry a rape whistle. If you find that you are about to rape someone, blow the whistle until someone comes to stop you.

10. Don’t forget: Honesty is the best policy. When asking a woman out on a date, don’t pretend that you are interested in her as a person; tell her straight up that you expect to be raping her later. If you don’t communicate your intentions, the woman may take it as a sign that you do not plan to rape her.

"

 Leigh Hofheimer   (via rosqua)

Yes.

(Source: elloquent-denouement, via weliveinarapeculturesociety)

153,253 notes

midcenturymodernfreak:

Samba de Orpheu" | The Baja Marimba Band

24 notes

trumblebumbledore:

ionaonie:

hazelgracelancaster:

Chris Hardwick talks about censorship of women’s bodies and absolutely nails it.

The bleeping. The bleeping. I just. THEY ARE EXACTLY THE SAME WORDS. 

God bless

Hey, Chris. Points.

(via bestworstideaever)

164,200 notes

You go, girl.

(Source: prismcess, via bestworstideaever)

521,562 notes

theatlantic:

Why Young Sexual Assault Victims Tell Incoherent Stories

In the heated debate over Woody Allen, there is one thing people seem to agree on: The public can never be sure what exactly happened that day in 1992. Dylan Farrow says her father led her into an attic room and sexually molested her. Allen insists he’s innocent. His supporters—including his friend and documentarian Robert B. Weide, who defended him in The Daily Beast last weekend—argue that a review of the evidence may even suggest that Farrow’s mother planted false memories in her mind. Meanwhile, publications like Jezebel, Salon, and The New Republic have tried to take a balanced perspective, reminding readers that the truth is unknowable.
Yet there is something inherently imbalanced about a child abuse case. The very secrecy that makes the truth “unknowable” is an instrument of the crime. With no witnesses or credible legal evidence, the “he said/she said” conundrum prevails. The assailant knows this, and he can use it to his advantage. As soon as children make allegations, they enter a world filled with adult concepts—ideas they themselves don’t entirely understand. In order to even tell their stories, they have to learn a new language, putting vague, undefined feelings into unfamiliar words. The whole drama plays out in a grown-up context, which means the grown-up always has the upper hand. Neutrality never even has a chance.
Read more. [Image: LeviQ/Shutterstock]

theatlantic:

Why Young Sexual Assault Victims Tell Incoherent Stories

In the heated debate over Woody Allen, there is one thing people seem to agree on: The public can never be sure what exactly happened that day in 1992. Dylan Farrow says her father led her into an attic room and sexually molested her. Allen insists he’s innocent. His supporters—including his friend and documentarian Robert B. Weide, who defended him in The Daily Beast last weekend—argue that a review of the evidence may even suggest that Farrow’s mother planted false memories in her mind. Meanwhile, publications like Jezebel, Salon, and The New Republic have tried to take a balanced perspective, reminding readers that the truth is unknowable.

Yet there is something inherently imbalanced about a child abuse case. The very secrecy that makes the truth “unknowable” is an instrument of the crime. With no witnesses or credible legal evidence, the “he said/she said” conundrum prevails. The assailant knows this, and he can use it to his advantage. As soon as children make allegations, they enter a world filled with adult concepts—ideas they themselves don’t entirely understand. In order to even tell their stories, they have to learn a new language, putting vague, undefined feelings into unfamiliar words. The whole drama plays out in a grown-up context, which means the grown-up always has the upper hand. Neutrality never even has a chance.

Read more. [Image: LeviQ/Shutterstock]

923 notes